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Used to vr. be used to

A lot of people get confused about the difference between 'used to do' and 'be used to doing' 

Used to / Be used to


Used to do something 

  • I used to live in the country. 

Be used to (doing) something 

  • I'm used to working at night. 

Used to 


Formulation

Positive 
I 

used  
to smoke 
Negative  
I 
didn't 
use 
to smoke 
Question 
did 
you 
use 
to smoke 

We use 'used to do something' to talk about something that happened regularly in the past but does not happen now. 'Used to' is followed by an infinitive. Note that 'used to' has no present form. 
We use to go for sailing... 

  • We used to go for sailing, but we don't have time for it now. 
  • used to live in Berlin before I moved here. 
In questions and negative sentences, we use it in the form use to. 

  • Where did you use to live? 
  • I didn't use to smoke. 
We can use 'would' instead of 'used to' when we are talking about things that often or always happened in the past.  

  • When I was at university, we would often have coffee after class. 
We don't use 'would' to talk about facts or states in the past. 
I would live in Berlin. 

Be used to 


Formulation 

Positive 
I 
am 
used to 
the hot weather 
Negative  
I 
am not 
used to 
criticism 
Question 
Are 
you 
used to 
spicy food 


We use 'be used to something' to talk about something that we are accustomed to. The expression be used to can be used in any tense with any pronoun. It is followed by a noun or a gerund. 

  • am used to the traffic noise.  
  • We are used to living in the village. 
  • She is used to being a single mother. 
  • Are you used to cold weather? 
  • am not used to getting up early. 
  • He was used to doing what he wanted to do. 
We can also use the expression get used to. 

  • I quickly got used to my new job. 

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