What is another word for paper money?

Bill of exchange

a written order to pay a particular amount of money to a person or organization on a particular date:

Cash

money in the form of notes or coins:
to pay in cash / to make payments in cash

Bill

a piece of paper money
a ten-dollar bill

Fiduciary currency

banknotes and coins in circulation

Note / Banknote

a piece of paper money
a €20 note

15 adjectives to describe a place

Alive

full of emotion and excitement:

Bustling

full of busy activity:

Calm

free from stress:

Charming

very pleasing and attractive:

Cosmopolitan

including people from different countries:

Enchanting

very interesting and attractive:

Fascinating

extremely interesting and attractive:

Fresh

new and therefore interesting or exciting:

Homey

pleasant and comfortable like home:

Inspiring

Making you feel you want to do or create something:

Lively

full of life and energy:

Peaceful

Quiet and calm:

Picturesque

(of a place) Attractive in appearance:

Unspoiled

beautiful because it has not been changed by people:

Vibrant

energetic and exciting:


Learn English with Movies: Titanic

Learn this Titanic Vocabulary before watching the movie.

Bet (v)

to risk money on the result of a race or an event:
I can't believe you bet our tickets.

Be about to (id)

to be close to do something:
The moment of truth boys. Somebody's life's about to change.

Queue (n)

a line of people waiting for something:
Have you been through the inspection queue?

Amount (v)

to be the same as or equal to something else:
He'll never amount to a thing, trust me.

brand new (adj)

completely new:
It smells so brand new. Like they built it all just for us.

Strike (v)

to discover gold or oil by digging or drilling:
Her husband had struck gold someplace out west.

Steam (v)

1. to go somewhere very quickly:
2. to travel in a boat or train that uses power produced by steam:
We were steaming west from the coast of Ireland, with nothing out ahead of us but ocean...

Envision (v)

to form a picture in the mind:
He envisioned a steamer so grand in scale

Stern (n)

the back part of a ship or boat:
Tonnage (n)
the size of a ship or the amount of goods it is able to carry, expressed in tones:
Is it because men think half the women around have big sterns and should be weighed in tonnage?

Precipice (n)

a very steep side of a cliff or a mountain:
I felt like I was standing at a great precipice, with no one to pull me back.

Distract (v)

to take somebody's attention away from something:
You're distracting me. Go away.

Look forward to (phrasal verb)

to feel excited and pleased about something that is going to happen:
Which is why I'm not looking forward to jumping in after you.

Regale with

to amuse or entertain somebody with jokes or stories:
Perhaps you could join us for dinner tomorrow, to regale our group with your heroic tale?

Bum (v)

to ask someone to give you something:
Can I bum a cigarette?

melancholy (adj)

very sad:
I know you've been melancholy, and I don't pretend to know why.

Dough (n)

(old-fashioned, slang) money:
I've got all my dough tied up in this thing.

Moniker (n)

name or nickname:
That's quite a moniker. I may hafta get you to write that down.

Amber (n)

a hard clear yellowish-brown substance, used in jewellery:
And I was trapped in it, like an insect in amber.

Fella (n)

an informal way of referring to a man or someone's boyfriend:
So you feel like you're stuck on a train you can't get off 'cause you're marryin' this fella.

Dismiss (v)

to decide that someone or something is not necessary or important:
chuckle (n)
an act of laughing quietly:
And I'm tired of people dismissing my dreams with a chuckle and a pot on the head.

Gracious (adj)

behaving in a pleasant, polite, and calm way, especially to people of a lower rank:
The others were gracious and curious about the man who'd saved my life.

Steerage (n)

in the past, the part of a ship in which people with the cheapest tickets used to travel
Tell us of the accommodations in steerage, Mr Dawson.

Ma'am (n)

used as a polite way of talking to a woman:
The best I've seen, ma'am. Hardly any rats.

Preoccupy (v)

to think or worry about something a lot:
You build the biggest ship in the world and this preoccupies you?

Exertion (n)

great physical or mental effort:
Your exertions below decks were no doubt exhausting.

Words related to Sale

Bake sale

an event at which baked goods such as cakes are sold to make money, usually for a charity:

Fire sale

a sale at extremely discounted prices of things that a company or person owns, in order to pay debts:

Garage sale

a sale of used things, usually held in someone's garage or outside their house:

Estate sale

a sale of the possessions of a person after their death:

Rummage sale

an event at which old or used clothes, etc. are sold to make money for charity:

Bring-and-buy sale

a sale, usually for charity, at which people bring things to be sold and buy things brought by other people:

Standardized Tests in the U.S.

Words related to SNOW

snowflake

a small, soft piece of frozen water that falls from the sky as snow:

snow flurry

a small amount of snow that is blown by the wind:

snow squall

a sudden heavy snowfall that reduces visibility, often with strong winds:

snowstorm

a storm with a lot of snow:

blizzard

a severe snowstorm with strong winds:

snowdrift

a deep pile of snow that is formed by the wind:

Phrasal Verbs for Election

Vote down

to reject or defeat something by voting against it:
The new salary proposal was voted down.

Vote through

to approve something such as a law or plan by voting for it:
The committee voted through a proposal for a new village school.

Stand down

to leave your official job or position:
She's decided to stand down after ten years.

Get in

to be elected to a political position:
She got in by 400 votes.

8 Ways to Use the Preposition "at"

The preposition "at" is very common in English. It can be used in different situations and contexts. In this article, I explain the common use "at" as a preposition.

1. We use "at" to say where something is or where something happens:
8 Ways to Use the Preposition "at"