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Hunger and Thirst Vocabulary

Hunger is the feeling you have when your body needs food. Thirst is the feeling of needing to drink.

Here is the list of words related to hunger and thirst


Binge (v)

to eat or drink more than is normal or healthy
  • When she’s stressed, she binges on beer.



Demolish (v)

informal. to quickly eat up something
  • He demolished the whole chicken.

Devour (v)

to eat something (your food or prey) greedily
  • The lions quickly devoured the antelope.

Down (v)

to drink all of something quickly
  • He downed six pints of beer.

Dry (adj)

informal. thirsty
  • I was so dry after the game.

Diet (n)

meal plan that is designed by a dietitian or doctor in order to help patients lose weight or stay healthy
  • plant-based/low-carbohydrate/detox/liquid diet
  • The doctor put my father on diabetic diet.
  • to be/go on a diet

Famished (adj)

extremely hungry
  • I am famished after exercise.
  • Let’s stop for lunch. I am famished.

Fast (v)

to consume no food or drinks for a particular period of time
  • During the month of Ramadan Muslims fast between dawn and sunset.

Gobble (v)

informal. to eat a large amount of food, often hurriedly and noisily
  • He gobbled his burger up.

Gorge (v)

to eat a lot of food so that you feel full
  • She gorged herself on junk food before dinner.

Greed (n)

a strong wish for more food than your body needs

Guzzle (v)

to drink a lot of something greedily
  • He spent the whole day guzzling black coffee.

Knock back (v)

informal. to drink a lot of alcohol

Overeat (v)

to eat much more than is normal; to eat more than you should

  • I am more likely to overeat under stress.

Overindulge (v)

to do too much of something enjoyable, especially eating or drinking
  • You had overindulged in alcohol last night.

Parched (adj)

informal. very thirsty
  • I need a drink of water. I’m parched.

Peckish (adj)

slightly hungry
  • I’m starting to feel a bit perkish.

Pig out (v)

informal. to eat a large amount of food
  • We pigged out on sandwiches and rolls.

Ravenous (adj)

extremely hungry
  • I’ll get a big sandwich. I’m ravenous.

Scoff (v)

American English: scarf
to eat something very fast
  • He scoffed all the sandwiches.

Snarf up/down (v)

informal. to eat or drink something noisily and greedily
  • The kids snarfed down all the pizza.

Starving (adj)

informal.very hungry
  • Where’s lunch? I’m starving!

Stuff (v)

informal. to eat a lot of something; to eat large amounts of food
  • He staffed himself with junk food.

Stuffed (adj)

informal. not hungry anymore because you have eaten too much
  • ‘Would you like some cake?’ ‘No thanks, I’m stuffed

Slake (v)

Synonym. quench
to satisfy your thirst with a drink
  • We slaked our thirst with watermelon.

Wolf down (v)

informal. =devour

  • The kids wolfed down the birthday cake.

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